Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)

The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. The test is intended to assess a student’s readiness for college. It consists of three major sections: Critical Reading, Mathematics, and Writing. Each will be scored on a 200 to 800 scale. The essay is optional and will not be factored into your overall SAT score. The essay scores will be shown separately on the report.

  1. The exam will have 154 questions and is 3 hours long (plus 50 minutes if you are taking the essay).
  2. Most 4-year colleges will ask that you take the test, as it allows institutions to compare students from different high schools across the globe and make admission decisions.
  3. The standardized test scores may also help you qualify for scholarships. Some colleges and educational organizations award scholarship money to students based, in part, on SAT scores.
  4. There are a number of colleges that require the SAT II (also known as SAT Subject Tests), in addition to the SAT. These tests are hour-long and content-based, and they allow you to showcase achievement in specific subject areas in which you excel. There are 20 SAT Subject Tests in five general subject areas: English, History, Languages, Mathematics and Science.
  5. SAT Subject Tests allow you to differentiate yourself in the college admission process or send a strong message regarding your readiness to study specific majors or programs when you are in college.
  6. You’ll want to take the tests that are required or recommended by the colleges that you’re interested in. For example, if you wish to study engineering, then Math may be required. Also consider subjects that you excel in or may want to major in, to showcase your strengths and interests.
  7. You can retake the tests and colleges will usually look at your best score. However, an increasing number of colleges in the US are becoming ‘test-flexible’, or ‘test-optional’, or completely opting out of asking students for their SAT scores. Please reach out to individual colleges for clarity on the tests you are required to take for the admission process.

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