SAT Reading Comprehension Quiz 1

Reading Comprehension (also known as Critical Reading) questions test your ability to understand a passage and answer questions on the basis of what is stated and implied in the passage. The test may be time consuming, and full of tricky answers, but you can learn to avoid the common pitfalls with the right approach.

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Question 1: 

There is considerable evidence that irrigation
may have played a pivotal role in the foundation
of the earliest civilizations, such as that of Sumer
in the Tigris-Euphrates valley. The reasons for the
influence of irrigation are twofold. The
development of irrigation allowed for extremely
efficient agricultural production, creating the
surplus of food resources that must serve as the
foundation for any civilization. Furthermore,
constructing the elaborate system of canals and
drainage networks was a task of tremendous
complexity. The centers of commerce,
administration, and science that accomplished the
task eventually blossomed into the cities
that served as the cornerstone of Sumerian
civilization.

The sentence in lines 4-5 (“The reasons…are twofold”) refers to

Question 2: 

There is considerable evidence that irrigation
may have played a pivotal role in the foundation
of the earliest civilizations, such as that of Sumer
in the Tigris-Euphrates valley. The reasons for the
influence of irrigation are twofold. The
development of irrigation allowed for extremely
efficient agricultural production, creating the
surplus of food resources that must serve as the
foundation for any civilization. Furthermore,
constructing the elaborate system of canals and
drainage networks was a task of tremendous
complexity. The centers of commerce,
administration, and science that accomplished the
task eventually blossomed into the cities
that served as the cornerstone of Sumerian
civilization.

As used in line 11, “tremendous” most nearly means

Question 3: 

The city of Havana stands today as a testament
to its turbulent yet glorious history. This lively
center of all things Cuban looks today as much as it did
when it was built more than 100 years ago. An
air of distinction and wealth, albeit now somewhat
faded, lingers in its neighborhoods. Spanish
architecture, a symbol of a colonial past, graces the
city, though the paint and plaster of many of the
buildings have chipped and peeled as the years have
passed. Amidst the gentle aging of this great city, it is
the generosity and friendliness of the residents
that have allowed Havana to survive and flourish.

The word “air” in line 5 most nearly means

Question 4: 

The city of Havana stands today as a testament
to its turbulent yet glorious history. This lively
center of all things Cuban looks today as much as it did
when it was built more than 100 years ago. An
air of distinction and wealth, albeit now somewhat
faded, lingers in its neighborhoods. Spanish
architecture, a symbol of a colonial past, graces the
city, though the paint and plaster of many of the
buildings have chipped and peeled as the years have
passed. Amidst the gentle aging of this great city, it is
the generosity and friendliness of the residents
that have allowed Havana to survive and flourish.

With which of the following statements would the writer most likely agree?

Question 5: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.


The ideas expressed in the first two sentences (lines 1-8) have structures that can be described as

Question 6: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.

The author suggests which of the following about the works of Martha Marques and Helen Friend (line 2)?

Question 7: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.

In saying that I ka Ho’okumuana “embraces both the past and the future” (line 12) the author suggests that the quilt

Question 8: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.

The author mentions the traditional kapa moe (line 19) in order to show that they

Question 9: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.

As used in line 26, “resilience” most nearly means

Question 10: 

Hawaiian quilts, such as those created
by Marthe Marques and Helen Friend, reflect an eclectic
blend of early American quilt making, Hawaiian
tradition, isaldn imagery, spiritual influences, current
events, and modern vision. Helen Friend, a recognized
contemporary Hawaiian artist, produces quilted
artworks inspired by nature’s power, Hawaii’s natural
environment, current events, and historic textiles. Her
quilt titled I ka Ho’okumuana (In the Beginning) depicts
an aerial view of an erupting volcano constructed of
appliqued red flames set against a black background
fabric. This quilt embraces both the past and the future; it
clearly falls within the provenance of a traditional
Hawaiian quilt, and at the same time it challenges the
boundaries of that definition.
While many historians claim that New England
Missionaries brought quilting to the islands in 1820, it
has been reported that Hawaiian women fashioned
decorative bed coverings, called kapa moe, long before
the missionaries’ arrival. Kapa moe were constructed
from multiple layers of tapa, a paper-like fabric crafted
from mulberry bark. The top layer of tapa was often
dyed and decorated with beautiful geometric designs.
The layers, each one comprised of a large piece of fabric,
were stitched together, possibly to provide additional
resilience.
With the arrival of the missionaries, Hawaiian quilters
were introduced to American materials, quilting methods
and designs. The missionaries brought metal needles,
cotton fabrics, and cotton thread to Hawaii. In addition,
they taught the native women to work with both
patchwork and appliqued quilting. In patchwork quilting,
designs on the quilt’s top layer are created by piercing
small bits of fabric together to form patterns, then
overstitched with contrasting designs when the layers of
the quilt are united. With appliqued quilts, the quilt’s top
layer is decorated with pieces of fabric cut to form
images and designs. While many patchwork quilts
incorporate small geometric shapes in various colors
aligned to form larger geometric shapes, appliqued
quilting allows quilters to express more natural shapes
and images.

As used in line 33, “piercing” most nearly means


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