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GRE Reading Comprehension Quiz 2

Posted on Oct 13, 2017
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Questions 1 - 2 below refer to the following passage:


The daughter of Jewish emigrants, Nadine Gordimer
was born in 1923, twenty-five years prior to apartheid,
the institutional segregation and classification of race
in South Africa. Gordimer focused her life’s work on
(5) authentic portrayals of black African culture and the
social issues and injustices surrounding race, class,
and the landscape of her home country. It has been
suggested that Gordimer’s tone as a writer reflects
South African race relations and violence prior to,
(10) during, and after apartheid; many suggest her literature
informally serves as the historical text of a nation. As
many black African authors were banned (1948-1990),
Gordimer stepped outside of her own writing and
questioned the stifling of the African “creative
(15) imagination” and the negative role it would have on
the nation, its voice, and its literature. Just shy of
90, Gordimer still stands her ground; refusing to react
to the increased violence surrounding her community in
Johannesburg, she rejects hiding behind the barbed-wire
(20) walls that surround her neighbors’ homes.

Question 1:

A conclusion can be drawn from the passage that South Africa in 2009 was
Questions 1 - 2 below refer to the following passage:

The daughter of Jewish emigrants, Nadine Gordimer
was born in 1923, twenty-five years prior to apartheid,
the institutional segregation and classification of race
in South Africa. Gordimer focused her life’s work on
(5) authentic portrayals of black African culture and the
social issues and injustices surrounding race, class,
and the landscape of her home country. It has been
suggested that Gordimer’s tone as a writer reflects
South African race relations and violence prior to,
(10) during, and after apartheid; many suggest her literature
informally serves as the historical text of a nation. As
many black African authors were banned (1948-1990),
Gordimer stepped outside of her own writing and
questioned the stifling of the African “creative
(15) imagination” and the negative role it would have on
the nation, its voice, and its literature. Just shy of
90, Gordimer still stands her ground; refusing to react
to the increased violence surrounding her community in
Johannesburg, she rejects hiding behind the barbed-wire
(20) walls that surround her neighbors’ homes.

Question 2:
The author of the passage is concerned with
Questions 3 - 4 below refer to the following passage:

The common crow of the Himalayas is the large
all-black species known as the Indian corby or jungle
crow (C. macrorhynchus). Unlike its grey-necked cousin,
this bird is not a public nuisance; nevertheless it
(5) occasionally renders itself objectionable by carrying
off a chicken or a tame pigeon. In May or June it
constructs, high up in a tree, a rough nest, which is
usually well concealed by the thick foliage. The nest is
a shallow cup or platform in the midst of which is a
(10) depression, lined with grass and hair. Horse-hair is
used in preference to other kinds of hair; if this be
not available crows will use human hair, or hair plucked
from off the backs of cattle. Those who put out skins to
dry are warned that nesting crows are apt to damage them
(15) seriously. Three or four eggs are laid. These are dull
green, speckled with brown. Crows affect great secrecy
regarding their nests. If a pair think that their
nursery is being looked at by a human being, they show
their displeasure by swearing as only crows can, and by
(20) tearing pieces of moss off the branch of some tree and
dropping these on the offender's head!
Question 3:

The purpose of the passage is to

Questions 3 - 4 below refer to the following passage:

The common crow of the Himalayas is the large
all-black species known as the Indian corby or jungle
crow (C. macrorhynchus). Unlike its grey-necked cousin,
this bird is not a public nuisance; nevertheless it
(5) occasionally renders itself objectionable by carrying
off a chicken or a tame pigeon. In May or June it
constructs, high up in a tree, a rough nest, which is
usually well concealed by the thick foliage. The nest is
a shallow cup or platform in the midst of which is a
(10) depression, lined with grass and hair. Horse-hair is
used in preference to other kinds of hair; if this be
not available crows will use human hair, or hair plucked
from off the backs of cattle. Those who put out skins to
dry are warned that nesting crows are apt to damage them
(15) seriously. Three or four eggs are laid. These are dull
green, speckled with brown. Crows affect great secrecy
regarding their nests. If a pair think that their
nursery is being looked at by a human being, they show
their displeasure by swearing as only crows can, and by
(20) tearing pieces of moss off the branch of some tree and
dropping these on the offender's head!
Question 4:

According to the passage, which of the following is/are true?

Question 5 below refers to the following passage:


The criticism of art requires, above all else, the
ability to separate one's own taste from one's
intellectual evaluation of the work. It is easy for the
unwary critic to find her judgment swayed by subjective
(5) factors such as her emotional response to a piece of
art. This tendency must be strictly curbed so that the
critic is able to judge the art with an unbiased eye.
One of the best ways to build the foundation for this
objective criticism is to obtain an education in the
(10) history of art, cultivating the ability to place a given
work within a social and ideological context. Only once
the critic has established this intellectual framework
can she allow herself to react to the art on a visceral
level, blending her subjective and objective responses
(15) into a unified critique.

Question 5:

It is implied in the passage that studying art history will teach one to
Question 6-8 below refers to the following passage:

The name 'millipede' means “thousand feet.”
Although they do not have 1,000 feet, as their name
suggests, unique species of this arthropod have been
recorded as having up to 750 feet. Millipedes have two
(5) pairs of legs on each somite, which is a segment of the
body. They have a short thorax, made up of four
segments, each bearing one pair of legs. Because
millipedes are slow by nature, they need to be well
protected from potential predators. Their shell
(10) (integument) is made of calcareous material and gives
them some protection from certain predators such as
ants. Most species will roll up into a coil when
disturbed to protect their undersides. Some species roll
on to their backs and move away quickly in a snake-like
(15) movement. Many millipedes also protect themselves from
predators by secreting toxic or repellent fluids from
special glands positioned along the side of the body.
Since millipedes feed on decomposing vegetable matter,
fungi, and new growth of plants, their maneuvers are
(20) purely defensive; they are prey, not predators.

Question 6:

According to the passage, the millipede is classified as

Question 6-8 below refers to the following passage:

The name 'millipede' means “thousand feet.”
Although they do not have 1,000 feet, as their name
suggests, unique species of this arthropod have been
recorded as having up to 750 feet. Millipedes have two
(5) pairs of legs on each somite, which is a segment of the
body. They have a short thorax, made up of four
segments, each bearing one pair of legs. Because
millipedes are slow by nature, they need to be well
protected from potential predators. Their shell
(10) (integument) is made of calcareous material and gives
them some protection from certain predators such as
ants. Most species will roll up into a coil when
disturbed to protect their undersides. Some species roll
on to their backs and move away quickly in a snake-like
(15) movement. Many millipedes also protect themselves from
predators by secreting toxic or repellent fluids from
special glands positioned along the side of the body.
Since millipedes feed on decomposing vegetable matter,
fungi, and new growth of plants, their maneuvers are
(20) purely defensive; they are prey, not predators.

Question 7:

The passage supplies information that would answer which of the following questions?

Question 6-8 below refers to the following passage:

The name 'millipede' means “thousand feet.”
Although they do not have 1,000 feet, as their name
suggests, unique species of this arthropod have been
recorded as having up to 750 feet. Millipedes have two
(5) pairs of legs on each somite, which is a segment of the
body. They have a short thorax, made up of four
segments, each bearing one pair of legs. Because
millipedes are slow by nature, they need to be well
protected from potential predators. Their shell
(10) (integument) is made of calcareous material and gives
them some protection from certain predators such as
ants. Most species will roll up into a coil when
disturbed to protect their undersides. Some species roll
on to their backs and move away quickly in a snake-like
(15) movement. Many millipedes also protect themselves from
predators by secreting toxic or repellent fluids from
special glands positioned along the side of the body.
Since millipedes feed on decomposing vegetable matter,
fungi, and new growth of plants, their maneuvers are
(20) purely defensive; they are prey, not predators.

Question 8:

It can be inferred from this passage that millipedes

Question 9-10 below refers to the following passage:


Joyce Carol Oates wrote her frequently-anthologized
short story 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'
in 1966, and based the tale on the actions of serial
killer Charles Schmid. Despite its real-life
(5) inspiration, interpretations of the story vary wildly.
The plot follows Connie, a pretty but irresponsible
teenager who spends evenings meeting boys at the local
drive-through restaurant. One evening, she catches the
attention of an older man, and the next day he arrives
(10) at her house with a friend, and tries to coax Connie
into leaving with them. When that tactic fails, he
instead threatens her, eventually compelling her to give
in to his demands. The story ends with her departure,
leaving her fate unknown. Some have observed that
(15) Connie's experiences are a metaphor for the transition
from childhood to womanhood; others have seen the
character of the menacing older man as an allegory for
Satan. Oates herself has indicated that both of these
interpretations, and many others, are reasonable. The
(20) variety of thematic elements and the ambiguity of the
story's ultimate meaning have made it a popular choice
for English classes from the secondary level up to
graduate school; in this respect, it is similar to
Shirley Jackson's 'The Lottery.'
Question 9:

With which of the following statements regarding the study of 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?' would the author of the passage most likely agree?

Question 9-10 below refers to the following passage:


Joyce Carol Oates wrote her frequently-anthologized
short story 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'
in 1966, and based the tale on the actions of serial
killer Charles Schmid. Despite its real-life
(5) inspiration, interpretations of the story vary wildly.
The plot follows Connie, a pretty but irresponsible
teenager who spends evenings meeting boys at the local
drive-through restaurant. One evening, she catches the
attention of an older man, and the next day he arrives
(10) at her house with a friend, and tries to coax Connie
into leaving with them. When that tactic fails, he
instead threatens her, eventually compelling her to give
in to his demands. The story ends with her departure,
leaving her fate unknown. Some have observed that
(15) Connie's experiences are a metaphor for the transition
from childhood to womanhood; others have seen the
character of the menacing older man as an allegory for
Satan. Oates herself has indicated that both of these
interpretations, and many others, are reasonable. The
(20) variety of thematic elements and the ambiguity of the
story's ultimate meaning have made it a popular choice
for English classes from the secondary level up to
graduate school; in this respect, it is similar to
Shirley Jackson's 'The Lottery.'
Question 10:

The passage most strongly supports which of the following inferences about the story's inspiration, Charles Schmid?


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